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Collection Highlights

The DDFIA collection of Islamic art is characterized by a number of distinct sub-collections. Considered here are notable highlights, including tilework (particularly of the Ilkhanid period), Qajar Iranian art in all media, late Ottoman Syrian interiors and associated furnishings, textiles and carpets, and commissions and architectural recreations associated with Shangri La specifically. 

Tilework

Tilework

In terms of media, ceramic arts constitute the largest component of the DDFIA collection. While both portable ceramic vessels and tilework are represented, tilework is the collection’s indisputable strength.

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Late-Ottoman Syrian interiors and furnishings

Late-Ottoman Syrian interiors and furnishings

The DDFIA collection of late-Ottoman Syrian art and architecture includes two interiors as well as associated furnishings and architectural elements displayed elsewhere.

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Qajar Iran

Qajar Iran

Artwork produced during the Qajar period in Iran (1779–1924) —as well as the periods immediately preceding it, Afsharid (1736–96) and Zand (1750–94) —constitutes the largest dynastic corpus in the DDFIA collection.

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Commissions and Recreations

Commissions and Recreations

One of the most intriguing and unparalleled components of the DDFIA collection is its corpus of large-scale architectural features custom-made for Shangri La in the 1930s by workshops in India, Morocco and Iran.

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Textiles and Carpets

Textiles and Carpets

Doris Duke’s (1912–93) collecting of Islamic art was often informed by her desire to acquire works of art that could be displayed, and often used, throughout her private home.

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