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Qajar Iran

Artwork produced during the Qajar period in Iran (1779–1924) —as well as the periods immediately preceding it, Afsharid (1736–96) and Zand (1750–94) —constitutes the largest dynastic corpus in the DDFIA collection. The collection is rich in media—wood, glass, enamel, ceramics, metal, paper, canvas—and includes a range of artworks: carpets, hangings, doors, windows, chairs, tables, tilework, manuscripts, wall and ceiling paintings, washing and storage vessels, boxes, jewelry, clothing fabric. Highlights according to media are considered below.

Wood Furnishings

Wood Furnishings

During the Qajar period in Iran (1779–1924), the painting of wood and pasteboard (papier-mache) surfaces with figural imagery, often in miniature scale, reached an apex.

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Painting

Painting

Later Iranian art of the Afsharid (1736–96), Zand (1750–94) and Qajar (1779–1924) periods is distinguished by the depiction of life-size figures, whether in stone relief, tilework or painting on canvas.

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Metalwork

Metalwork

The DDFIA metalwork collection consists of copper alloy tinned vessels, cast steel ones (some engraved and gilded, i.e. damascened), and finer examples of enameled silver and/or gold.

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Tiles

Tiles

Tilework of the Qajar period (1779–1925) was the dominant form of architectural decoration in Iran and is seen in the spectacular and colorful mosques, palaces, private houses, bathhouses, bazaars and city gates.

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Glass

Glass

*Stay tuned for a detailed report on the DDFIA Qajar glass collection.

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Textiles and Carpets

Textiles and Carpets

*Stay tuned for a detailed report on the DDFIA Qajar textile and carpet collection.

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