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Textiles and Carpets

Doris Duke’s (1912–93) collecting of Islamic art was often informed by her desire to acquire works of art that could be displayed, and often used, throughout her private home. This circumstance resulted in her acquisition of a variety of textiles with functional purposes: Persian, Indian and Spanish carpets for covering the floors; Central Asian embroideries (suzanis) for sheathing couches and walls; Egyptian and Indian appliques for blocking the sun’s glare; and Persian and Turkish velvets for decorating vitrines. Several notable sub-collections are considered here. With the exception of the pair of shaped Mughal carpets acquired by Duke in 1990, all of these textiles were regularly used and/or displayed at Shangri La.

Ottoman Silk Velvets

Ottoman Silk Velvets

Six gold-brocaded silk velvets (çatma) exemplify trends in the production of luxury textiles between 1600 and 1750 in the Ottoman Empire.

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Tents, Tent Panels, and Tented Spaces

Tents, Tent Panels, and Tented Spaces

Doris Duke became interested in tents and tented spaces early on in her collecting.

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Pair of shaped Mughal carpets

Pair of shaped Mughal carpets

The pair of shaped Mughal carpets belongs to a group of fine Indian carpets distinguished by an arched trapezoidal form, a pile of sheep’s wool, and rows of naturalistic floral bouquets oriented towards the left, upper, and right edges.

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